Food Services Industry

Studies suggest that around 57% of restaurant fires happen due to mishandling of cooking equipment. Therefore, installing a fire suppression system and keeping the aisles and passageway clear is more than necessary to control freak fire accidents.

Tasks in the food industry involve open flames, hot equipment, cooking oil, cleaning chemicals, and paper products that can cause fire hazards. Fire extinguisher compliance ensures that fire extinguishers are present at designated places that make them easy to access during emergencies.
1. Introduction
Fires can sometimes be caused by power failures, open flames on the stove, hot equipment, cooking oil spillage, improper use of abrasive cleaning products, etc. Commercial kitchens may employ different fire protection measures, but none can be more important than having a suitable fire extinguisher. The extinguishers play a significant role in containing the kitchen fires and keep them from spreading throughout the entire restaurant.
2. Process
Restaurants often work with greases and highly flammable oils, and the constant exposure to heat can pave the way for a potential fire. Therefore, it is advisable to keep a Class K extinguisher (i.e., a portable extinguisher) for kitchen fires caused by oils, fats, and grease that burn at high temperatures. These portable fire extinguishers contain chemical components meant to control or eliminate fires by releasing water, foam, gas, and other materials. If they are correctly used, they can prevent flames from getting out of hand. Ensure that you place the device in an area away from the stove and is away from other cooking equipment so that the flames do not reach it. However, even with the distance, always make sure that you place the extinguisher in any kitchen area with easy access.
3. Dos
a. Place the extinguisher in a place that you can quickly locate in the event of an emergency.
b. Always make sure to clean up any grease or oil spillage.
c. Place the fire extinguisher close to the areas with sources of electricity.
4. Don’ts
a. Do not keep flammable liquids close to the fire extinguisher.
b. Do not use extinguishers that have been damaged or tampered with.
c. Avoid using a device that has a missing seal or is past its expiry date

Corridors and halls blocked with materials could cause serious hazards, resulting in life-threatening accidents and injuries. Therefore, they should have sufficient clearance and should be kept clear of any obstruction.
1. Introduction
Restaurants are very vulnerable to fire hazards because of the open flames/stoves, hot cooking oils, electrical connections, cleaning products, etc. Given all these risks, it is crucial to have a proper fire protection plan in place, and one of the ways to do this is to chart out an effective fire escape plan that will protect both employees and patrons alike.
2. Process
Among the critical factors to fire protection is to have an effective evacuation plan, as an incident can strike at any time. Not only do the employers need to identify the means of escape, but they should also clear the aisles and passageways for a possible evacuation. Equipment and appliances should be arranged not to cause any blockage or obstructions in an incident. Rescue personnel enters through these areas, and any blockage may prevent them from entering and taking prompt action. Exit routes and pathways must be well–lit and marked with exit signs, thereby making it easier to locate them. And lastly, all emergency doors must lead directly to the exit routes and ensure that the doors are not locked or fastened in such a manner that they cannot be easily opened by patrons who need to escape.
3. Dos
a. Always make sure that you are aware and have verified your nearest and most accessible exit route.
b. Ensure that there are no obstructions or hindrances that come in the way of the exit routes.
c. The outside area of the exit should be clear to expedite the evacuation in case of any fire mishap.
4. Don’ts
a. Do not keep kitchen appliances, equipment, or stock in places that can potentially block passageways.
b. Avoid keeping password-protected emergency exits that would make escape difficult for patrons.